How the Tennis Bracelet got its name

What does tennis have to do with a diamond bracelet? Believe it or not, it all stems back to an an incident in 1987 when tennis champion Chris Evert was wearing a bracelet whose clasp broke in the middle of a televised match. The game was stopped to allow her time to find her pretty diamond accessory. Because of the huge audience viewing the match, a sudden craze was born for sleek inline diamond bracelets. From that moment on, this style of bracelet would be referred to as a tennis bracelet. 

The actual bracelet worn by Chris Evert was designed by George Bedewi. It featured a single row of symmetrical inline diamonds. In recent years, the term tennis bracelet has also been assigned to bracelets featuring other gemstones besides diamonds which are set in the same inline manner. 

The design of the tennis bracelet is not a new one. Before the televised incident, these bracelets were called eternity bracelets, and some stores will still refer to them as such today. Whatever you wish to call them, these lovely bracelets are a staple for many stylish women and their popularity only continues to grow. 

- Julie 


Bracelet pictured from BlueNile.com 
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About Julie Bean

Julie Bean is an artist and jewelry designer living in Los Angeles specializing in mixed media designs, resin, bead embroidery, and bead-weaving. She has taught numerous classes, been published in various magazines, and has recorded over 200 YouTube instructional beading videos. She is the senior designer at Beadaholique, creating hundreds of beading projects complete with detailed instructions. She also creates Steampunk and vintage-inspired jewelry under the name Julie Anne Bean which she sells at juried art fairs, Comic Con, and other venues. When not crafting and creating, Julie loves spending time with her husband and friends, traveling, cooking, and wandering antique markets. Learn more about Julie and see all of her project tutorials on the Beadaholique website.