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Beadaholique’s Blog Has Moved — Follow Us At Our New Home!

Redesigned Website

Hello, beaders! You might have noticed that we unveiled our new, redesigned website this week, and we’re so excited about the more visual-oriented layout, easier mobile browsing, filtered search feature, and best of all, our brand new Beader’s Rewards loyalty program. We wanted to let you know that as a result of the change, our blog will now be living at a different address — you can now catch our posts about new tutorials, guest designers, fashion and accessory trends, and all of our popular contests and giveaways at this link: www.beadaholique.com/blog. So bookmark the site of our new blog and make sure to follow us there… it’s only a few more months until our 12 Giveaways of Christmas, so don’t miss out! Thanks for reading!

Jewelry Trend Alert: Chokers Are Back

Vogue Chokers 1

We’ve been eating up every new facet of the 90s fashion comeback that’s been in full swing for a few seasons now, and this latest 90s-inspired trend is no exception! Here, Vogue spotlights the resurgence of the choker, the tight, flattering necklace made chic by the Winona Ryder and Drew Barrymore outfits we coveted in 90s flicks. Now, let us show you how you can get this look with fun and pretty Beadaholique choker patterns in many different styles.

The model above shows off the punkier, gothier side of the choker look, wearing a piece with thick, black ribbon and sumptuous, dangling gems. The La Nuit Necklace echoes the look of those edgy, heavy gems with its rich, sparkling Swarovski crystal dangles in shades of graphite and chrome. Or you can emulate the thick, dark, goth choker look Ms. Ryder sports in Beetlejuice with Colette’s Choker, shown on the left, a peyote bead-woven piece with a skeleton cameo focal. Looking for something thinner and more casual, yet still replete with 90s fashion goodness? The Evening Romance Ribbon Choker, shown on the right, features a strip of bead-loomed Miyuki Delicas on an elegant grosgrain ribbon necklace.

Vogue Chokers 2

On the other end of the choker spectrum is its dainty, feminine, Victorian look, which can be achieved with pearls and plenty of lace. The Angel’s Wings Bridal Choker, shown on the bottom, imparts the lovely illusion of pearls floating about the neck, fastened by an angel-shaped rhodium-plated box clasp. The Emily Choker, in the middle, uses lustrous rose gold pearls to frame the face. And the Vintage Lace Bridal Choker, top right, employs a loose, open netting stitch to recreate the look of delicate lace in an ethereal color palette of pale pink and crystal. Enjoy this fashion call-back to an earlier era!

Pantone Fashion Color Report Fall 2016

Pantone Fall 2016 Colors2

Are you ready to start revving up for fall fashion? The Pantone Color Institute has released its fall fashion color report, in which Pantone’s tastemakers have compiled 10 colors we’ll be seeing on runways, in stores and, of course, in jewelry come autumn. “The desire for tranquility, strength, and optimism have inspired a Fall 2016 color palette that is led by the blue family,” said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute.

Pantone Fall 2016 Colors

“Along with anchoring earth tones, exuberant pops of vibrant colors also appear throughout the collections,” she continues. “Blue skies represent constancy as they are always above us. Grays give a feeling of stability, red tones invite confidence and warmth, while the hot pinkish purples and spicy mustard yellows suggest a touch of the exotic.” Eiseman notes that this color palette “transcends gender” and experiments playfully with our typical notions of fall hues. Let’s take a closer look at the entries:

Pantone Riverside Beadaholique

The first color in the collection, Riverside, is a medium-deep blue with a slightly muted, grayish quality. Riverside is described by Pantone as “cool and calming, strong and stable,” and is subtly vibrant, but maintains a soothing sense of constancy. You can translate this hue into your fall beading in a few ways. The mottled, lake-blue hue of sodalite gemstone beads very closely mirrors Riverside’s inky appearance, and the Swarovski crystal color Montana offers a nearly identical crystal shade.

Pantone Airy Blue Beadaholique

The second blue hue in the roster is Airy Blue, a lofty color that “evokes feelings of lightness and freedom” for those “seeking weightlessness in a world heavy with conflict,” according to Pantone. The inclusion of Airy Blue is also a nod to Serenity, one of Pantone’s 2016 colors of the year. You can find Airy Blue analogues in Swarovski crystal pearls in Light Blue, and also the Czech glass half moon beads in white terracotta blue pictured above.

Pantone Sharkskin Beadaholique

There’s something edgy about the deep gray tone of Sharkskin, and yet it manages to remain neutral, Pantone says, adding that this cool shade “showcases practicality through a dependable but contemporary lens.” Able to be paired with anything, Sharkskin is a color that “the rest of the palette can literally and theoretically rest on.” You can add this dynamic gray to your jewelry projects with the use of gun metal beads, or with Swarovski crystals in Crystal Silver Night. If you’re excited by mixed media, add a touch of charcoal pigment to Jeweler’s Concrete for a cool gray concrete look that will give your wardrobe a mod pop.

Pantone Aurora Red Beadaholique

The fall palette takes a vibrant turn with Aurora Red, “a bold red that is warm, sensual and immediately pleasing to the eye,” Pantone writes. This hue is exciting, radiates confidence and gets the blood pumping, Eiseman adds. Look to Czech glass beads in siam red for a dose of this hue, or Ultra Suede in scoundrel red to add this bright red to the background of your bead embroidery or bezel projects.

Pantone Warm Taupe Beadaholique

Warm Taupe, a “hearty, pleasing and approachable neutral,” is a color that “suggests reassurance and stability,” and is “trusted, organic and grounded,” according to Pantone. This comfortable cousin to beige is a timeless wardrobe anchor, and there are many ways you can incorporate it into your autumn jewelry-making. Miyuki Delicas in variegated taupe, seen above, have the added bonus of appearing like tiny slices of bamboo, whose organic feel pairs well with this color. The same goes for Regaliz cork cord in natural, a versatile, faux leather cord that mimics the appearance of light-colored wood.

Pantone Dusty Cedar Beadaholique

Next on the list is Dusty Cedar, a fall/winter version of the pinks we see in spring and summer. This “dusty rose-toned pink shade,” Pantone says, “exudes warmth and welcome,” and I completely agree! Ruby rondelle gemstone chain will give you a trendy, Dusty Cedar look, and can be worn as an elegant necklace or drop earrings. We also have a lustrous selection of red cultured pearls in hues that match the Pantone shade, including the burgundy nugget pearls shown above. This color is alluring, mysterious, and will match the touch of rouge on our cheeks caused by autumn and winter winds.

Pantone Lush Meadow Beadaholique

The sole green entry in the collection, Lush Meadow, “brings to mind fresh botanicals and foliage,” according to Pantone. This rich, elegant hue is almost akin to the sophisticated emerald, which is why I suggest Swarovski crystals in Emerald as the first choice for emulating it in jewelry. The beguiling, symbolic scarab bead, shown above, is an especially striking emblem. Czech glass silky beads in green zircon picasso are another appropos choice, as the picasso mottling emulates the leafy, mossy feel of a forest.

Pantone Spicy Mustard Beadaholique

The collection perks up with Spicy Mustard, a “spicier, zestier yellow than in previous seasons” that adds a “splash of uplifting vibrancy,” Pantone says. This exotic hue showed up in animal prints and bold geometric designs during this past New York Fashion Week. To bring this color into your beading, work in these Miyuki cube beads in opaque mustard yellow, or these bold and vibrant Golem Design Studio ceramic lentil beads. More flattering than straight yellow due to its rich, ochre tone, this color will make a bright wardrobe addition for fall.

Pantone Potters Clay Beadaholique

With Potter’s Clay, we come back to the traditional autumn color of turning leaves. A neutral earth tone with “real substance,” this color contains “elements of russet orange in its undertones, giving it a grounded feeling that’s anything but flat,” Pantone notes. Deep orange hued carnelian gemstone beads evoke the deeper-than-pumpkin color of Potter’s Clay, along with, for mixed media workers, Vintaj patina in Rust.

Pantone Bodacious Beadaholique

The last color in the collection is a bit of a surprise. But with a name like Bodacious, this bright, rich purple was made to confound expectations. Bodacious “lends itself to vibrant color combinations” and “turns fashion accents into fashion statements,” according to Pantone. The bold silhouette and bright fuscia hue of these vintage German lucite rondelle beads seems to me to be the perfect embodiment of how to wear this color. And for the textile-inclined, our Light Orchid shade of S-lon is also a near-match.

Pantone’s fall 2016 colors largely pair well together, and evoke a strong seasonal image. What are your favorite elements of the Pantone palette? Let us know what you think!

ENDED: Nunn Design Summer Collection Giveaway!

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THIS GIVEAWAY HAS NOW ENDED. Thank you to everyone who participated. One winner has been chosen at random and is being contacted.

We promised there would be a surprise at the end of our week of free Nunn Design mixed media tutorials here on our blog — and here it is: Today we’re launching our Nunn Design summer giveaway, in which you can win a selection of pieces from the new summer collection shown in the photo above! The collection is valued at over $70, and includes open frame pendants, tiny charms, hammered flat tags and several itsy circle bezel rings.

To enter the giveaway, simply leave a comment on this blog post telling us your favorite piece from the Nunn Design summer collection. This giveaway will end Friday, July 29th at 4pm PST. At that time, we will choose one winner at random from all valid comments.

IMPORTANT: Only comment once per giveaway using your existing Disqus account, or simply comment as a guest with your name/nickname and a valid email address (enter an optional password if you would like to create a Disqus account). Please do not use your Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus account when commenting since these methods have been unreliable when contacting winners. You can only win one Beadaholique giveaway every 12 months. For a complete description of how to enter our giveaways, click here. Good luck!

Free Nunn Design Tutorial #6: Stacking Rings with Crystal Clay, Glitter Roxs and Resin

Becky Nunn Stacking Rings with Crystal Clay

Welcome back for the last of our week-long series of free Nunn Design tutorials, generously provided by mixed-media queen Becky Nunn herself! In this tutorial, Becky shows us a cool trick for mimicking the look of opal chips or Roman glass by using well-placed Glitter Roxs in Crystal Clay, covered by a clear dome of resin. Set into her brand new itsy circle bezel rings, this technique creates a pretty mosaic look that begs to be replicated in earrings, a necklace and more. Read on for the full instructions.

Here’s what you’ll need:

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A Nunn Design hammered itsy circle bezel ring
Crystal Clay
Nunn Design 2-part resin kit
JudiKins Glitter Roxs

Other supplies:
Toothpicks
Wet wipes
Wooden blocks

1. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for handling and mixing the Crystal Clay. While wearing gloves, pinch off two equal sized balls of Part A and Part B and blend together fully until the clay is no longer marbled and uniform in color. You have approximately 90-120 minutes of working time before the clay starts to harden, so take your time. Once the clay is thoroughly mixed, remove your gloves to make it easier to work with the clay. Pinch off a small lentil sized ball of the Crystal Clay and roll it in the palm of your hands until it is smooth.

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2. Place the ball of clay into the hammered itsy circle ring and pat it down into the bezel, creating a flat and even surface. If you have too much Crystal Clay in your ring bezel, pinch off the excess and pat it with your fingertip to make it smooth and crease free.

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3. Use a wet-wipe to remove any Crystal Clay from the ring. When the clay hardens, it is like cement. Cleaning your hand and the metal surface as you go will result in a higher quality finished piece.

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4. Once the Crystal Clay is placed in the hammered itsy bezel ring, place a couple of Glitter Roxs flakes onto the surface of the uncured Crystal Clay. I use the beeswax-covered toothpick that is included in the Crystal Clay kit. Let the clay set for about 2 hours or until hard.

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5. Read the resin instructions for safety concerns. When I work with resin, I always protect my work surface, make sure the room is ventilated, wear gloves and a mask, and have wet wipes handy. To start, place one plastic cup (included in the Nunn Design resin kit) onto your table. For curing purposes, it is important that the resin be an exact 1 to 1 ratio of Part A and Part B. I suggest getting your eyes level with the resin so you can see the lines on the measuring cup. Pour Part A of your resin kit up to the 1/2 oz. mark on your measuring cup. Pour Part B of your resin kit into the same cup until it is filled to the 1 oz. mark.

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6. Set a timer for 2 minutes. Using a stir stick from the Nunn Design resin kit, slowly and carefully stir your resin, scraping the sides as you stir. Stir for the full 2 minutes. After 2 minutes, scrape both sides of your stir stick on the edge of your resin filled cup. Set the mixture under a warm lamp for 5 minutes. This helps the air bubbles in the resin rise to the surface and pop.

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7. Place your hammered itsy bezel ring in between two surfaces to make sure that they are level. You can use wooden blocks or stir sticks. I like to apply tape onto the surface to prevent the resin from sticking if there is any overflow.

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8. Using a stir stick, drizzle a wee bit of resin onto the surface of the hammered itsy bezel ring. Add just enough resin to create a slight dome.

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9. Use a toothpick to move the resin around so that there is a full even coverage. If you do have any overflow, use a wipe to clean up any resin. Let cure for up to 72 hours. Once your piece has fully cured, it is easy to remove any resin that might have overflowed: use a pair of needle nose pliers to gently detach the resin from the ring. Once you are able to remove a little bit of the resin, it is fairly easy to peel away the rest of the resin that had spilled. Be patient and your clean up efforts will be rewarded.

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That’s all for our week of Nunn Design tutorials, but don’t go anywhere — tomorrow you’ll have a chance to win a gorgeous collection of Nunn Design pieces, so check back on our blog then!

Free Nunn Design Tutorial #5: Making Sculpted Relief Resin Molds

Becky Nunn Sculpted Resin Mold 1

When Becky Nunn first sent us these great tutorials, this is the one that made me gasp out loud. Sculpting resin? I’d never thought of that! Here, Becky walks us through the process of creating a custom resin mold using any texture you like, dusting the mold with pearlized mica powder, setting an open-back bezel (from her new summer collection) in place and pouring the resin so it takes the texture of the mold. This technique has lovely, ultra-customizable results, as you can see. Read on for a full tutorial!

Materials you’ll need:
Easy Mold Silicone Putty
A Nunn Design brass metal stamping for texture (or a found object!)
A Nunn Design open back deep bezel pendant
Nunn Design 2-part resin kit
Castin’ Craft resin pigments
Mica powder

Other supplies:
Q-tips
Wet wipes
Toothpicks
A non-stick work surface (Becky uses a business card)

1. Pinch off two equal sized balls of Part A and B of the Easy Mold Silicone Putty. Getting the knack for mixing just the right amount of putty will take some practice. You might mix too much or too little putty the first time. Try your best to guess how much putty you will need in order to have approximately 1/8 inch of putty around the outside edge of your bezel’s rim. You will also want the thickness of the silicone putty to be approximately 1/4 inch.

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2. The Easy Mold Silicone Putty has a 3-minute working time before it begins to harden and not take the impression. Knead both part A and part B together until the putty is blended completely and has a uniform color.

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3. Roll the fully mixed Easy Mold Silicone Putty into a round ball and flatten slightly. Make sure the putty is smooth and not wrinkled.

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4. Press your brass stamping or found object into the silicone putty, but not so far into the putty that you hit the bottom.

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5. Quickly remove the brass stamping or found object (you can use a toothpick to help release it) and press in your open back bezel in a position that frames the brass stamping impression. Be sure to double check that your bezel is level in the mold. Let the silicone putty set for 25 minutes. Tip: To prevent your mold from sticking onto your work surface, use a glossy business card or a plastic bag, or a non-stick work surface.

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6. After the silicone putty has set for 25 minutes, slightly bend back the edge of the mold to release the putty from the edge of the bezel. Voila, you are ready to move on to the next step!

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7. Read the resin instructions for safety concerns. When I work with resin, I always protect my work surface, make sure the room is ventilated, wear gloves and a mask, and have wet wipes handy. To start, place one plastic cup (included in the Nunn Design resin kit) onto your table. For curing purposes, it is important that the resin be an exact 1 to 1 ratio of Part A and Part B. I suggest getting your eyes level with the resin so you can see the lines on the measuring cup. Pour Part A of your resin kit up to the 1/2 oz. mark on your measuring cup. Pour Part B of your resin kit into the same cup until it is filled to the 1 oz. mark.

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8. Set a timer for 2 minutes. Using a stir stick from the Nunn Design resin kit, slowly and carefully stir your resin, scraping the sides as you stir. Stir for the full 2 minutes. After 2 minutes, scrape both sides of your stir stick on the edge of your resin filled cup. Set the mixture under a warm lamp for 5 minutes. This helps the air bubbles in the resin rise to the surface and pop.

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9. After your resin has been under the lamp for 5 minutes, pour a small amount of the mixed resin into a second measuring cup. Add in a toothpick tip worth of both the Castin’ Craft opaque yellow pigment and the Castin’ Craft opaque blue pigment to create the teal color shown here. You can mix the full 1 fluid ounce measuring cup of resin if you want, but I transfer the resin into smaller cups because it is easier to stir and less messy to move around when it’s less full. Tip: Be sure that the colorant does not equal more than 10% of your resin as having more than 10% could prevent it from curing properly!

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10. Place the open back bezel pendant back into its groove in the mold. Using a Q-tip, rub some pearlized mica powder into the crevices of the textured silicone mold.

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11. Using your stir stick, drizzle the colorized resin into the bezel. Before the bezel is filled to the flush level of the bezel, take a toothpick and gently move around the resin to see if there are any air bubbles trapped in your mold or along the edge of the bezel. If any air bubbles are within the resin, they will rise to the surface from the agitation. Move the bubbles to the edges to pop, or breathe on them. The hot air from your breath will make the air expand and the bubble will pop.

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12. Let your resin cure for at least 24 hours. Once cured, slightly bend back the edges of the silicone mold to release the resin-filled bezel.

Becku Nunn Sculpted Resin Mold Shell

13. Experiment with different textures for your mold, and different resin pigments and mica powder colors to create stunning, personalized pieces of your own!

Becky Nunn Sculpted Resin Mold 2

Becky Nunn Sculpted Resin Mold 3

Becky Nunn Sculpted Resin Mold 4

Come back tomorrow for the last Nunn Design tutorial, right here on our blog!

Free Nunn Design Tutorial #4: Embedding Organics in Resin in Open-Back Bezels

Nunn Design Organics in Resin Necklace 1

One of the neat things about resin is that you can use it to capture anything you want to turn into jewelry — beads, glitter, charms, photographs, and even organic matter such as dried flowers or leaves. In this tutorial, Becky Nunn explains how to embed organics into the open-back bezels found in her newly-released summer collection. (For a visual demonstration of how to prepare your organic pieces to be embedded in resin, check out the exclusive video Becky shot at our studio showing how to incorporate organics into resin.)

Here’s what you’ll need:

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A Nunn Design open-back bezel or Nunn Design open frame
Nunn Design 2-part resin kit
Scissors

Other supplies:
Dried flowers or other organics
Packing tape
Toothpicks
Wet wipes

1. Once you’ve prepared your organics according to the instructions in this video, cut a piece of packing tape and place it on your work surface. Place your open frame pendant or open-back bezel onto the tape. Press down and rub your bezel back and forth on your work surface, burnishing the tape onto the backside of the bezel. Trim away any excess of the packing tape to avoid it sticking to anything while you are pouring or letting your piece cure. Trust me…it happens!

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2. Read the resin instructions for safety concerns. When I work with resin, I always protect my work surface, make sure the room is ventilated, wear gloves and a mask, and have wet wipes handy. To start, place one plastic cup (included in the Nunn Design resin kit) onto your table. For curing purposes, it is important that the resin be an exact 1 to 1 ratio of Part A and Part B. I suggest getting your eyes level with the resin so you can see the lines on the measuring cup. Pour Part A of your resin kit up to the 1/2 oz. mark on your measuring cup. Pour Part B of your resin kit into the same cup until it is filled to the 1 oz. mark.

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3. Set a timer for 2 minutes. Using a stir stick from the Nunn Design resin kit, slowly and carefully stir your resin, scraping the sides as you stir. Stir for the full 2 minutes. After 2 minutes, scrape both sides of your stir stick on the edge of your resin filled cup. Set the mixture under a warm lamp for 5 minutes. This helps the air bubbles in the resin rise to the surface and pop.

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4. Place your organics into your open bezel or frame. Make sure the organics are fully pressed against the tape. This will prevent the organics from rising to the surface and “floating.”

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5. Place a business card or some heavy card stock under your bezel, making it easier to move your projects without disturbing them or getting any resin on your fingers. Now, there are two ways to embed your organics — the fast way and the slow way.

a) The fast way: Carefully drizzle your mixed resin over the organics, filling the bezel until partially full, but not domed. Use a toothpick to agitate the resin and make sure there aren’t any air bubbles lurking below the surface. Once you are confident, continue to pour your resin until the bezel is filled and highly domed and set aside to cure. This doesn’t work 100% of the time; I have had my organics rise to the surface and poke out of the resin.

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b) The slow way: The slow way requires you to do two pours of your resin, but the results are 100% spot on. Slowly drizzle your mixed resin over the organics, filling the bezel partially full, but not filled. Use a toothpick to agitate the resin and make sure there aren’t any air bubbles lurking below the surface. Let your resin cure. Mix up another batch of 2-part resin and drizzle the resin into your bezel. Before filling your bezel completely and letting it dome, use a toothpick to slightly agitate the resin and to make sure there aren’t any bubbles lurking. The first pour will anchor your organics so they won’t be able to rise to the surface of the bezel!

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6. Wait for the resin to fully cure. To finish your open bezel or frame, remove the packing tape from the backside. If you have any excess residue from the packing tape on the backside, use the tape to remove it like you would when you are removing lint or animal fur from your clothes. Keep touching the packing tape onto the sticky surface until it is no longer sticky.

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7. Here are some other examples of pieces that use this fun technique.

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Be sure to stop by again tomorrow for Nunn Design tutorial #5!

Free Nunn Design Tutorial #3: Sculpted Crystal Clay Rings with Mica Powder

Nunn Design Crystal Clay Mica Powder Rings

Welcome back for the third entry in our week of Nunn Design tutorials! We’ve already covered Becky Nunn’s techniques for embedding ball chain or rhinestone chain into Crystal Clay in a channel bezel and embellishing colorized 2-part resin and adding Glitter Roxs for a faux gold leaf effect. Today, follow along as Becky teaches us how to sculpt Crystal Clay, dust the design with mica powder, and create a beautiful set of stacked rings.

Here’s a list of what you’ll need:

Easy Mold Silicone Putty
A Nunn Design hammered itsy circle ring (or several, to stack) from her new summer collection
Crystal Clay in black
A Nunn Design brass stamping
Mica powder

Other supplies:
Q-tips
Wet wipes
Non-stick work surface

1. To make the silicone mold, pinch off two equal sized balls of Part A and B of the silicone putty. Be sure that the balls are large enough and will allow you to make an impression to fit your brass stamping of choice.

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2. The Easy Mold Silicone Putty has a 3-minute working time before it begins to harden and not take the impression. Knead both part A and part B together until the putty is blended completely and has a uniform color. Tip: Getting the knack for mixing just the right amount will take some practice. You might mix too much or too little putty the first time.

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3. Roll the fully mixed silicone putty into a round ball and flatten it slightly. Make sure the putty is smooth and not wrinkled. Press your brass stamping into the silicone putty, but not so far into the putty that you hit the bottom. Tip: Your mold might stick to your work surface, so use a non-stick mat, or a glossy business card or a plastic bag.

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4. The silicone molding putty takes 25 minutes to cure. Once the putty is hard to the touch, bend back the sides to release and remove the brass stamping. Now you are ready to create your impressions with the mold.

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5. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for handling and mixing the Crystal Clay. While wearing gloves, pinch off two equal sized balls of Part A and Part B and blend together fully until the clay is no longer marbled and is uniform in color. You have approximately 90-120 minutes of working time before the clay starts to harden, so take your time. Once the clay is thoroughly mixed, remove your gloves to make it easier to work with the clay.

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6. Pinch off a small, lentil-sized ball of Crystal Clay and roll it in the palm of your hands until it is smooth. Place it into the hammered itsy circle ring and pat it down into the bezel. You will want a small slightly domed ball like shown here. If you have too much, remove the clay, pinch off a wee bit, roll and pat into the bezel.

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7. Once the Crystal Clay is set in the hammered itsy ring, it is time to create the impressions with the silicone mold. Use a Q-tip to rub some mica powder into the crevices of the silicone mold. Tap any excess mica powder back into the container.

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8. This is the trickiest part of this tutorial — if you have too much clay it might squish out the sides, but if you don’t have enough, your impression won’t show up well. The beauty is, you can redo the process by scraping out the clay in the bezel and putting in a new ball of clay, until you get the look that you like. So, knowing that, take a deep breath and press your Crystal Clay filled itsy ring into the mold. I often like to pick up my mold to make sure I am applying pressure evenly. If the clay dome in your bezel ends up being fairly high, you can roll the clay around in the mold to make sure you are getting an impression on all sides of the domed clay.

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9. Once you have an impression that you like, use a wet wipe to clean up any Crystal Clay that might have gotten on the ring bezel. The clay hardens like cement, so cleaning it up now and being tidy as you go makes the process easier and the results so much nicer. Then, allow the Crystal Clay to cure for at least 12 hours. How fun was that!

Nunn Design Crystal Clay Mica Powder Earrings

See you back here tomorrow for tutorial #4!

Free Nunn Design Tutorial #2: Adding Glitter Roxs to Colorized Resin for a Faux Gold Leaf Look

Nunn Design Resin Glitter Roxs Necklace

We’re back with another tutorial from Becky Nunn today, highlighting a neat trick you can do with Nunn Design resin and pigments — using JudiKins Glitter Roxs to create a faux gold leaf effect. This look stands out especially on the flat tag pendant Becky used for this necklace project, but you can use it in many different applications. Read on for instructions!

Here’s what you’ll need for this technique:

A Nunn Design flat tag pendant or connector
Nunn Design 2-part resin kit
Castin’ Craft opaque pigments
JudiKins Glitter Roxs

Other supplies:
Wet wipes
Toothpicks
Non-stick work surface (here Becky uses a business card)

1. Read the resin instructions for safety concerns. When I work with resin, I always protect my work surface, make sure the room is ventilated, wear gloves and a mask, and have wet wipes handy. To start, place one plastic cup (included in the Nunn Design resin kit) onto your table. For curing purposes, it is important that the resin be an exact 1 to 1 ratio of Part A and Part B. I suggest getting your eyes level with the resin so you can see the lines on the measuring cup. Pour Part A of your resin kit up to the 1/2 oz. mark on your measuring cup. Pour Part B of your resin kit into the same cup until it is filled to the 1 oz. mark.

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2. Set a timer for 2 minutes. Using a stir stick from the Nunn Design resin kit, slowly and carefully stir your resin, scraping the sides as you stir. Stir for the full 2 minutes. After 2 minutes, scrape both sides of your stir stick on the edge of your resin filled cup. Set the mixture under a warm lamp for 5 minutes. This helps the air bubbles in the resin rise to the surface and pop.

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3. After your resin has been under the lamp for 5 minutes, pour a small amount of the mixed resin into a second measuring cup. Add in a toothpick tip worth of the Castin’ Craft opaque white pigment and stir. If the color isn’t opaque enough, continue to add more pigment. You can mix the full 1 oz. measuring cup of resin if you want, but I transfer the resin into smaller cups because it is easier to stir and less messy to move around when less full. Tip: Be sure that the colorant does not equal more than 10% of your resin, as having more than 10% could interfere with curing!

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4. Use a stir stick to drizzle a small amount of colorized resin onto your flat tag. It is always easiest to add just a wee bit and add more, versus pouring on too much and having to clean up the overflow.

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5. With a toothpick, pull the colorized resin to the edges of the flat tag. Nunn Design’s 2-Part Resin is a doming resin. The resin will get to the edges and not overflow but only if you have not applied too much to the surface area. Moving the resin around the holes can be a little tricky if you have a lot of resin drizzled onto the flat tag.

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6. If the colorized resin does fill a hole, slide the flat tag over to the edge of the business card and gently pick it up from the underside (being careful not to touch the edges). Move the flat tag to another area on your business card. This will clear the hole of resin.

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7. In order to control the flow and the quantity of the Glitter Roxs that I added to my flat tag, I sprinkled a couple Roxs onto a plastic bag. Gently tap the surface of the plastic bag and apply the Glitter Roxs where desired.

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8. Use a toothpick to gently guide the Glitter Roxs where you would like them. Let the resin cure for 24 hours before finishing your necklace.

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Stay tuned for tutorial #3 on Monday!

Free Nunn Design Tutorial #1: Embedding Objects into Crystal Clay in a Channel Pendant

Nunn Design Crystal Clay Embedded Earrings

This week and next, we’ve got a treat for you — designer Becky Nunn has provided six fully-photographed tutorials to accompany the release of her new Nunn Design Summer Collection. That means you can learn six new beautiful jewelry-making techniques, incorporating resin, Crystal Clay, and of course, versatile Nunn Design components. We’ll be posting 1 stepped-out tutorial every day for the next week, culminating with a special surprise — so stay tuned!

In this first tutorial, Becky shows us how to embed rhinestone cup chain or ball chain into Crystal Clay wrapped around a Nunn Design open bezel deep channel pendant. Here’s what you’ll need for this technique:

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A Nunn Design circular open bezel deep channel pendant
Crystal Clay
Nunn Design faceted ball chain
Rhinestone cup chain

Other supplies:
Wet wipes
Toothpicks
Flush cutters

1. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for handling and mixing the Crystal Clay. While wearing gloves, pinch off two equal sized balls of Part A and Part B and blend together fully until the clay is no longer marbled and uniform in color. You have approximately 90-120 minutes of working time before the clay starts to harden, so take your time. Once the clay is thoroughly mixed, remove your gloves to make it easier to work with the clay. Then pinch off a small ball of the clay and roll it in the palm of your hands until smooth and round. Any creases in the clay will be more challenging to smooth out later, so roll the clay until it is nice and smooth.

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2. Roll the Crystal Clay in the palm of your hand to create a snake like shape.

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3. Starting at the looped area of the open bezel deep channel pendant, start to press the Crystal Clay into place. When adhering the clay, I like to use my thumb to push the clay forward and to flatten it toward the edges of the channel. This helps me adhere an even amount of clay in the channel.

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4. When the clay is embedded in the channel all the way around the bezel, pinch off your excess Crystal Clay. Use your fingers to pat smooth and blend the start and stop points of the clay. Use a toothpick to make sure that the clay lays flat inside of the loop.

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5. Use a wet wipe to remove any Crystal Clay that may have gotten on your hands or on the sides of the open bezel deep channel pendant.

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6. Now you are ready to begin wrapping your faceted ball chain. Start by embedding one end of the ball chain along one of the edges of the channel. Wrap the chain all the way around to the start point. Use your flush cutters to cut the chain where the chain begins to overlap. Try not to press down too hard during the initial part of attaching the chain. You will want to press it down just hard enough to embed the chain into the clay, but if you press down too hard it causes the chain to embed into the clay at different depths. It also causes the clay to squish out from under the chain and will make successive chain wraps end up at uneven levels.

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7. Continue on your next round of chain. When it comes time to wrap around the loop, start the chain at the beginning of the loop and end at the other end.

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8. Once the faceted ball chain is fully covering the open bezel deep channel pendant, use your fingers to gently embed the chain into the clay.

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9. Use a wet wipe to clean up any clay that might be left on the chain or on the side edges of the bezel. The Crystal Clay will harden like cement, so it is best to remove it now.

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10. You can try different combinations of faceted ball chain and rhinestone cup chain to create different looks.

Nunn Design Crystal Clay Embedded Necklace

Nunn Design Crystal Clay Embedded Pendant

For a video demonstration of a similar instance of embedding chain into Crystal Clay, check out the exclusive video Becky Nunn shot with us showing how to embellish an itsy bottle with rhinestone cup chain. Hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial — come back tomorrow for tutorial #2!